Friday, July 20, 2018

Long Tour of Bradwell 2: Top Tips?

Following an enjoyable day out on the first part of the Long Tour of Bradwell I decided to attempt the second part. I'm trying to work out if its reasonable to go in for the race.  The written directions are fab. top tip is to follow these carefully, I only referred to the map occasionally!




The route from Edale Road back to Bamford is fairly straightforward after a steady pull on the side of Win Hill the run from the springs (check point 8) along the old railway to CP9 should be a welcome section of speed! The run down to the river Derwent is really nice and I'd recommend this as a walk. Today was pleasant I had to shush the cows away from the gate to go across the bridge near the wier at Bamford mill.

The route from Bamford is a long steady plod following lanes and dirt tracks this didn't present any navigational challenges. Arriving at Burbage Bridge the instructions provide three alternatives. I concluded that the best alternative was probably option 2. The route through to Lawrencefield was fine until check point 14 I went in the wrong direction from here. Apparently, on the day, this section will be taped. When I did this I didn't locate the inclined plane and dropped down to Padley chapel.

The route is clear to the leadmill bridge at Hathersage, at torside farm I continued on to leam farm - the sign for Torside farm is hidden however there is a clear sign for Hog Hall. Be careful here. The run along the Abney clough is very pleasent, it's a great place for running which I haven't visited enough. Although the directions were sufficient I think it's easy to go wrong along here

For me the tactics for the day are to walk up the hills (remembering what I learned from the Spire Ultra a great lesson), oh, and don't forget to have a decent break at the check points.

There is quite a few sections of steady downhill I plan to jog these. The main sections coming to mind are as follows.

steady jog down through cave dale to Castleton and past hollowford
Jog the following sections

  • down from Hollins Cross
  • down Lose Hill
  • from Ladybower springs to bamford
  • along Stanage
  • down green drive

Although my running has been minimal I've attempted to maintain fitness with some long cycle riding. Given my shortage  of training todays session has made me realise that the cycling is not providing the required level of fitness. One positive though I recovered well from this days session.

Sunday, July 8, 2018

Long Tour of Bradwell - Great Training Route!

Training for the long tour of Bradwell (LTB) has been proceeding brilliantly right up until the Edale Fell Race. A problem has developed which I alluded to in an earlier post. Oh well I guess this is the kind of thing that makes training more interesting!

 Although running has been rather limited, I've continued training with cycling and walking. As the day of the LTB draws nearer (7am start on Saturday 11th August) I have some long training runs to complete mainly substituted by a long cycle.

But a reconnaissance on foot beckoned unfortunately I was still unable to run so walking was required. I enjoyed this route so much I can't wait to make a decent effort with a run. In summary the 16.8 mile  has 3735 feet of ascent it starts from Bradwell and after a climb by Pindale quarries returns to Castleton via Cavedale. It then heads over to Edale by going over Hollins cross. The route heads up out of Edale and onto Ringing Roger via the Nab. A run along to the Druids stone is followd by a steep descent before ascending Lose hill via Back tor. Todays route returned to Hope and then directly to my starting point at Bradwell.

In my case the injury in question is an adductor tendinopathy. Typically tendons take a late of patience to help recover I've been following some guidelines on runner connect.
https://runnersconnect.net/groin-pain-runners-diagnosing-treatment-prevention/

Recovery has started and I ve started managing  1 minute of running and a minute of walking and repeating that 10 times. This has now been extended to 5 minutes walking + 5 minutes running repeated 3 times.

Basically recovery from something like this requires a great deal of care and patience. I've been checked out by Marcus Scotney at Holly well physiotherapy. I'm now attempting to follow an exercise program to achieve strengthening and balance in all the right places!

Sunday, July 1, 2018

Wild Grisedale Days

Hooray, Louis had a couple of school inset days. This provided a great opportunity to head up to the lake district to explore  Helvellyn, Dollywagon Pike and Fairfield. We stayed for one night at the ABMSAC George Starkey Hut. Our plan was to camp at Grisedale tarn to chill out and explore. With the current heat wave it was well worth backpacking upto the coolness of Grisedale tarn. What luxury!

The wonderful Striding Edge with Red Tarn

We had an early start, our intention was to arrive in Patterdale and to walk up Helvellyn. Louis was eager to attempt the route via striding edge. Unfortunately for me I have suspected Adductor Tendinopathy I'm currently trying an active physical training approach. Currently, I'm not running at all hopefully gentle walking would be OK. Gentle walking on striding edge? That might be challenging! The route is shown below, we tried not to make it too long.





Arriving in Patterdale we parked up at the George Starkey hut  and headed out onto the little road which leads to Grisedale tarn. Near the end of the road by the  Patterdale hall estate we came across a curious looking tree covered in webs, it turned out that these are silkworms! See Bombyx Mori.










The view along Grisedale was enticing, we had set off late and the temperature was climbing. The well defined path splits, the left split proceeds along Grisdale. We took the right hand split which goes gradually up the hillside. We progressed steadily up the side of Grisedale towards the point known as "The Hole in the Wall". It was just as well I was moving very slowly because this meant we kept fairly cool.

Stopping at the hole in the wall we had a quick drink and a snack, it was not long before the view of Striding Edge, Helvellyn and Red Tarn beckoned us on.





The stunning ridge of striding edge is very amenable. We had fun following the crampon scratches over the crest of the ridge. There are some good scrambling moves which were thoroughly enjoyed by both of us.  There are  some easier alternative paths just off to the side of the ridge.
We joined the gathering on Helvellyn summit and enjoyed lunch looking down at Red Tarn and back over Striding Edge.

Not surprisingly, this was a busy day, we joined the queue of people descending via Swirral edge. Catseye Cam was tempting but we continued down to Red Tarn. A few people were enjoying a dip and a swim. Louis was motivated by the though of ice cream I was thinking of ice cool beer.


Louis enjoyed our night in the George Starkey Hut. He particularly  enjoyed "photo bombing" a wonderful picture taken by his God father. Fired up by our day on Helvellyn we were both looking forward to our next adventure.
Departure from the George Starkey Hut
Because of the early start on our first day we did not wake particularly early and it took a little while to get prepared. We departed as the tutors for the incoming youth party booked in at the George Starkey hut arrived. According to one of them my rucksack was full of ballons :-) This was Louis's first time backpacking, it's a while since I'd been. Although I didn't struggle with my rucksack, I didn't need an illusion of a rucksack filled with balloons to help me along, I guess I'd need a few days backpacking to arrive at that point!

Once again we headed out along Grisedale, today we followed the valley we stopped at Ruthwaite hut chatting to some youngsters on their Duke Of Edinburgh Gold award expedition. They kindly took a photograph of us both. The next section of the walk took us up a bit more steeply upto Grisedale tarn.


We were somewhat roasted after our walk. It wan't long before we arrived at Grisdale tarn, there was the occasional wind which made our stay here pleasantly cool. Setting up the camp we realised that the gas cylinder was incompatible with the burner.. oh dear the planned feast would have to be curtailed. Louis didn't seem phased by an evening meal of Colin Caterpillars! The area was quite busy with people walking Fairfield and Dollywagon pike, don't forget Seat Sandal. It was particularly busy with the enthusiastic DofE expedition parties. This is a great spot to stop, a few people enjoyed a swim. Louis and myself settled for a paddle. The tarn is wonderfully clear and there were many tiny fish swimming and sometimes jumping around. We had planned on walking up Dollywagon pike in the evening our proposed route would take us up a ridge known as the tongue, the route is shown below.



The start of the route is from Ruthwaite Lodge so we had to head back down the main path from Grisedale tarn.

As we headed back up we needed to top up our water bottles there were plenty of active becks coming down the hillside so we explored these so as to top up with fresh water.





As we arrived back at camp a few more campers had arrived. We decided that we would enjoy the last of the suns rays and wandered around the tarn we headed towards the col between Seat Sandal and and Fairfield. As we crossed the beck we noted lots of little excitement in the water. Some of the fish were attempting to swim back up to the tarn, where the water has become shallow there was just enough water and the fish need to jump in order to make progress.  It was good to arrive at the col and view part of the route forming the well loved Fairfield horseshoe. The sun was still looking rather high and we both decided to continue to the summit of Seat Sandal. We were greeted with a marvelous early evening views as we looked across to our favourite lakeland peaks. As we descended we observed the shadow of Dollywagon pike moving up the side of the St Sunday crag-Fairfield ridge.





The area we had chosen to camp was near a beach and a little promontory by Grisedale tarn. The ground was very soft and with the regular breeze there were few insects. I have to say that this really was perfection. We had a very comfortable and cool night our plan was to catch the early rays of the day so we arose at the ridiculously early time of 0430.




 It was well worth getting up early for our planned walk to the top of Fairfield. My leg was feeling OK, it was a little sore so we decided to continue with our slow rate of movement.



It was a magical experience heading up towards Deepdale Hause, what a contrast with our adventure here earlier in the year (see. Easter at Patterdale and the Quiet Site). A more direct and steeper route follows the Bob Graham route in the direction of a point between Cofa Pike and the summit of Fairfield. We decided on a leisurely stroll towards Deepdale Hause this was good fun because we could enjoy a little scramble along the ridge. It really had the feel of an Alpine day with an early morning start and a quick ascent to some exciting mountain walking.

It was 0630 in the morning when we arrived at the top of Fairfield. This might sound crazy to some especially dragging a 9 year old boy along. I have to say Louis engaged with the excitement of the day and there was no dragging required for either of us!


It's difficult to capture the experience of a great mountain summit with words or pictures. The best suggestion is to go for it! After a fair number of mountain days you hit one of those special days that you want to hold in your memory. This was one of those days!
We arrived back at camp in time for breakfast. I managed to bribe Louis to take a wash in Grisdale Tarn by suggesting  that if he had a good wash a bath back at home might be avoided.... very dodgy!
Actually it was just pleasant and refreshing.


We soon packed up and returned to the George Starkey hut. We walked back to the Side Farm campsite tea room for an ice cream and a drink. By midday we were driving back to Chesterfield, happy with an excellent trip.

Sunday, June 10, 2018

Edale Country Fair and Fell Race

We had a great day today. It was the Edale country day, I asked Keisha and Louis if they'd like to walk or run  a fell race...  they both firmly agreed that we would all run the race.

Apart from fell racing, there was a lot to see and do including falconry, the bogtastic, bouncy castle, sheep shearing and more!

With a foggy start to the day we arrived in plenty of time to register and to get set for the race ahead. We'd all enjoyed some preliminary hill training with Cannon events running club for children.


The Edale fell race is part of the gritstone series organised by Accelerate http://www.gritstoneseries.co.uk/series/the-events/ .

The route is 4.7 miles and 1283 feet of ascent. It's actually one of my favourite short walks.
The route is described on the UK hill climbing and scrambling web site.
https://www.ukhillwalking.com/logbook/r/?i=448

First off at 1015 was our youngsters, they did a fantastic job amazing to see how much they enjoyed it. It was quite funny because they all looked up at the initial climb with a degree of trepidation. On the second lap of the course Keisha showed great spirit and told a joke on her second time up the hill everyone laughed.

My children are now planning the next event will it be Salt Cellar on the 3rd August or the Hope Wakes on the 27th June.

Despite leaving my watch in the car, I thoroughly enjoyed the race, practiced some hill climbing technique and enjoyed the final run home  which felt like a blast. It goes without saying that as a fell runner along with my fellow competitors we took great pleasure in trying to hop, bounce and skip from rock to rock good sticky grits stone on a fine dry day.

Wednesday, June 6, 2018

Lakeland Scrambling

                                                                                        

      lakeland Scrambling                                               


We scrambled up intake ridge

https://www.ukclimbing.com/logbook/c.php?i=31087                                                             

Glaciated slab near intake ridge is an excellent place to climb
https://www.ukclimbing.com/logbook/crag.php?id=760


                                                    Here is some of the scrambling we did.


that is bessyboot
this is us before we started scrambling

                                                        this  is some of the scrambling we did  which is closer to                                                                            bessyboot


                                                 This is tarn a leaves .

















  
while we were going up we moved together.

Moving together is a method for mountain climbers to get up big mountains
we used it to get up an easy climbing route in Borrowdale
When your moving together you are tied onto a rope with your friends,this is a safer way of walking up exposed mountain crags and hills . If you fall it will tug on your friend so get good grip of the ground in case your friend falls.While your walking remember to take coils so you don't trip over the loose rope.If your mate is going a head and doesn't have enough rope ,release your coils so the can go onword

If the scramble turns into a climb 

If you want more information on this topic use this link to get more information at a better website